“I love your content” is probably the most untrue statement a blogger receives

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I love getting positive feedback about my blog – it helps keep me motivated and encourages me to keep writing. Blogging is hard and takes a lot of effort, time, brain power, and what I like to call ‘comfort time’ which can be challenging for anyone with chronic pain or illness. So when I get an email in my inbox that says “I love your content” my heart sinks as I know it is unlikely to be true.

I’m writing this blog post at 6:35 in the morning feeling somewhat frustrated and deflated after reading an email from a “marketing officer”. She basically wrote to me asking if I can include a link from their website in a blog post of mine that she had supposedly read and apparently loved. Why am I writing in this tone? Because it is clearly not true.

How do I know this?

For starters, the content of the link she wanted me to include was not relevant to the topic of my blog. I’m guessing a keyword search or something was done, my blog appeared in the results, and she thought, “Oh I’ll approach this blogger and they can promote my business for free”.

Secondly, it was clearly a cut and paste job too. All these people – so-called marketing experts – contact me using the same format and text in their email. They stand out like a sore thumb. “I love your content”; “I thought it was really informative”; “[my link] will be a great resource for your readers”.

These people must genuinely think that bloggers are stupid, pushovers, and have nothing better to do than copy and paste these company links and include them in their blog. Oh and get nothing in return for their contributions to promote this company on their blog.



And when you don’t reply, they email again, thinking you’e got nothing better to do than read their second email asking to share their non-relevant content.

A lot of the time these emails end up in my junk folder, which I’m grateful of, as I don’t have the time or patience to come up with a reply. I read them in bulk and generally ignore them, but this one I read really got to me.

Genuine “I love your content” emails only please

The thing is, my readers read my blog to help them cope with the huge challenges of living with daily pain. Or to learn about blogging as that is also one of my main topics. I need make sure that my content is valuable and relevant. Sometimes I mix things up a bit and write about random stuff, but that is my choice as it’s my blog. Overall my content needs to be informative and helpful.

I’ve worked with a few companies since starting my blog and the genuine ones are brilliant. They really do read your posts, treat you with respect and kindness, and want to work with you because they genuinely feel your readers will benefit from their content.


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So if you’re emailing to say “I love your content” please don’t bother telling me unless you hand on heart have read at least some of my blog posts and you genuinely mean it.

Your thoughts

Do other bloggers feel the same?

Am I overreacting?

How do you stop getting these emails?

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13 thoughts on ““I love your content” is probably the most untrue statement a blogger receives

  1. Brandon says:

    Thanks for the post today; hard not to be upset by this. In a world where everyone wants “passive” income and to make money while they sit on a beach somewhere, this is hard to avoid. Many people don’t understand that it is the RELATIONSHIPS that you form with your consumers that matters. Sadly this is lost when the goal becomes the number of people you direct to your site. Keep doing what your doing!

    • Alice says:

      (I commented back to on this but not sure if it’s appeared 🧐). Thank you Brandon, you’re so right about relationships – it shows people care and it helps builds trust. The genuine ones really do stand out, including yourself πŸ˜ƒ

    • Alice says:

      (I commented back to on this but not sure if it’s appeared 🧐). Thank you Brandon, you’re so right about relationships – it shows people care and it helps builds trust. The genuine ones really do stand out, including yourself πŸ˜ƒ

  2. SpookyMrsGreen says:

    I regularly receive emails addressed “Dear Spooky” which make me laugh! And last week I received two identical email requests from different addresses that I suspect came from the same person. I gave them a copy and paste reply and they soon went away when I quoted my fee and refused to lower it. At least we know our blogs are showing up in searches, so that’s got to be a good sign!

    • Alice says:

      Good for you with the copy and paste reply! I’ve actually set an auto-reply on my mailbox now – hopefully they’ll get the hint. And yes, you’re right our blogs are being seen at least – every cloud πŸ™‚

  3. Invisibly Me says:

    Eugh yes, I get far too many of these too! I also get people that get very, very pushy when I say I don’t do free guest posts or link placements. The vast majority of the time they clearly haven’t read your blog and you’re right, it makes me wonder whether they think we’re all stupid/pushovers. I got someone continually calling me ‘sir’ the other day. The hell??

  4. Cynthia Covert says:

    Yes!!! Preach!!!! Seriously! I get so many of these emails that seeing that line makes me cringe. The worst is when the content they are trying to get me to share has absolutely nothing to do with my blog. And BTW I REALLY love your content!

    • Alice says:

      Aww thank you πŸ˜ƒ see, I can tell your genuine straight away. They really do think we are stupid, don’t they. It makes me laugh and annoys me at the same time.

  5. lifewithkadie says:

    I used to run accross this on my old blog all the time and it really annoyed me. I haven’t had many on my new blog but I’m just getting started. It always annoyed me though that they would send an email stating their product or service would be perfect for my post and my post would be about something completely different and 100% unrelated. I don’t think you’re overreacting, not at all. It’s annoying. It’s insulting. We take the time to craft these posts whether we are doing it for a reason (ie sharing content for a specific niche) or just blogging to get our own thoughts out and if you’re going to email me to ask me to share you’re link, one it better be related to my post/blog as a whole and two at least offer me something small in return such as access to the site, product, or service you want me to link to. I want to review what I am linking to to ensure it is a good fit. So I totally get what you’re saying! It really is such an untrue statement when they say “I love your content”.

    • Alice says:

      Thank you for saying I’m not overreacting, that makes me feel better. You’re right, blog work takes time and craft, and for some random stranger to just swoop on in there and ask to be a part of that – and for us to get nothing in return – is just a joke. I’m glad it’s not just me that experiences this, but at the same time, I wish none of us did.

  6. Despite Pain says:

    Oh, I get so many of those emails too and find them equally annoying. My blog is also regularly targeted with spam comments, often telling people about ‘magical cures’. As we both know, there are no magical cures, just a lot of people out there trying to profit from vulnerable people who would be prepared to do anything in the hope of feeling better.

    I do love your content, Alice. But you know I mean that!

    • Alice says:

      Oh the magical cures, don’t get me started on them. Again, it just demonstrates these people don’t understand the whole concept of “chronic” pain. They definitely hook on to the ‘hope’ part of marketing don’t they. And thank you for saying you love my content, that means a lot 😊

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